An interdisciplinary journal about regions, places, and cultures of the US South and their global connections
Posted on July 31, 2012
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Allen Tullos, Emory University

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Thelma Glass.

Thelma McWilliams Glass died on July 24, 2012 at age ninety-six. She was the last surviving member of the Women’s Political Council (WPC), a group of African American women in Montgomery, Alabama, who helped organize the 1955–56 bus boycott. Glass taught geography at Alabama State University from the late 1940s until she retired in 1981.

For more about Thelma Glass, read the biographical sketch in the Montgomery Advertiser by Erica Pippins. See David J. Garrow, "The Origins of the Montgomery Bus Boycott," Southern Changes 7, no. 5 (1985), for an overview of the WPC’s role in the boycott, a key event in the modern civil rights movement.

Posted on July 26, 2012
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Chuck Simmins, Photographer

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Chuck Simmins, Louisiana National Guardmen observe as water from the industrial canal overtops the levees, New Orleans, Louisiana, September 2008.
The Louisiana National Guard set up a road block in the Upper Ninth Ward during Hurricane Gustav, September 1, 2008. In this photograph, two Guardsmen located on the Claiborne Avenue Bridge observe as water from the industrial canal overtops the levees and pours onto the city. 
Posted on July 24, 2012
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Alan G. Pike, Emory University

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The Bulletin compiles news from in and around the US South. We hope these posts will provide space for lively discussion and debate regarding issues of importance to those living in and intellectually engaging with the US South.

  • Farmers and ranchers across the South, Midwest, and West are struggling to bring their crops to harvest and feed their herds. Texas ranchers sold nearly 36,000 head of cattle last week, triple the number from a few weeks ago. The Arkansas River Basin has been hit especially hard, which is evident in this map depicting drought severity across the country, with almost all of Arkansas in severe or extreme drought. Another set of annual drought maps, from the New York Times, demonstrates the extent of drought across the country since the 1890s.

    According to a recent report issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the scorching summer of 2012 has brought record temperatures and the worst drought in the continental United States since the 1950s. NOAA's report and a study they completed with a similar agency in the United Kingdom suggest that rising global temperatures may have contributed to the increased frequency of droughts in the last few years.

    Environmentalist Bill McKibben recently penned an essay in the magazine Rolling Stone which details the ways in which carbon emissions contribute to rising global temperatures. McKibben highlights the "terrifying new math" which reveals how serious the global warming crisis is and how the international community can address it.

Posted on July 19, 2012
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Katie Rawson, Emory University

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Documentary filmmaker George Stoney, 1916-2012.

Documentary filmmaker George Stoney, 96, died this week. His films include The Uprising of '34 (1995), about a large and violent strike in the southern textile industry in 1934, and All My Babies (1952), about Georgia midwife Mary Coley. All My Babies was selected for the National Film Registry in 2002. Stoney was also an advocate for and creator of public-access television, a teacher at New York University, and a native of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

He was remembered in the New York Times, the Village Voice, and by Tom Rankin at the Center for Documentary Studies. Adding to these accounts, below are links to the work and voice of Stoney himself—a discussion of making The Uprising of '34 and a discussion and streaming video of All My Babies and a 2010 follow-up documentary.

Links to Selected Works by George Stoney
Stoney, George. All My Babies: A Midwife's Own Story, 1952. Streaming at SnagFilms.

———. "All My Babies: Research," in Film: Book 1, The Audience and the Filmmaker, ed. Robert Hughes. New York: Grove Press, 1959. Available through Documentary Education Resouces.

———. "Filming The Uprising of '34," Southern Changes 16, no. 3 (1994).

Stoney, George and David Bagnall.A Reunion of All My Babies, 2010. Streaming at SnagFilms.

Posted on July 12, 2012
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Alan G. Pike and Katie Rawson, Emory University; Marion Post Wolcott, Photographer

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In light of our publication of Elizabeth Engelhardt's presentation "Forgotten Locavores: Letters and Literature of Market Bulletins," we decided to publish this series of photographs depicting preparations for a church picnic supper at St. Thomas Catholic Church, taken by Marion Post Wolcott on August 7, 1940 near Bardstown, Kentucky. We first came across the second photograph in the series, where African American and white men are cooking together, and wanted to know more about what was happening in this integrated outdoor kitchen. Looking at the curated series, where the white workers are called "parishoners" and the black workers are unidentified, it appears that the second image likely fits into expected paradigms of race and labor. The photograph of lamb and beef cooking is also a notable representation of local foodways, as barbecuing mutton is distinct to this area of Kentucky. More photographs in this series can be viewed in the Library of Congress's Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Collection.

Marion Post Wolcott, Poster advertising church picnic near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection, LC-USF33-030987-M4.
Marion Post Wolcott, Poster advertising church picnic near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection, LC-USF33-030987-M4.
Marion Post Wolcott, Cooking a fried supper as a benefit picnic supper which is being given by St. Thomas church, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, E 9026.
Marion Post Wolcott, Cooking a fried supper as a benefit picnic supper which is being given by St. Thomas church, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, E 9026.
Marion Post Wolcott, Barbecuing beef and lamb for a benefit picnic supper on the grounds of St. Thomas' Church, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection, LC-USF33-030968-M5.
Marion Post Wolcott, Barbecuing beef and lamb for a benefit picnic supper on the grounds of St. Thomas' Church, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection, LC-USF33-030968-M5.
Marion Post Wolcott, Parishoners peeling potatoes for a benefit picnic supper on the grounds of St. Thomas' Church, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection, LC-USF33-030969-M3.
Marion Post Wolcott, Parishoners peeling potatoes for a benefit picnic supper on the grounds of St. Thomas' Church, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection, LC-USF33-030969-M3
Marion Post Wolcott, Parishoners preparing food for a benefit picnic supper on the grounds of St. Thomas Church, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection,LC-USF33-030983-M5.
Marion Post Wolcott, Parishoners preparing food for a benefit picnic supper on the grounds of St. Thomas Church, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection,LC-USF33-030983-M5.
Marion Post Wolcott, Table in picnic grove set for St. Thomas church supper, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection, LC-USF33-030983-M5.
Marion Post Wolcott, Table in picnic grove set for St. Thomas church supper, near Bardstown, Kentucky, August 7, 1940. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Black & White Negatives Collection, LC-USF33-030983-M5
Posted on July 10, 2012
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Alan G. Pike, Emory University

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The Bulletin compiles news from in and around the US South. We hope these posts will provide space for lively discussion and debate regarding issues of importance to those living in and intellectually engaging with the US South.

  • In the wake of the Supreme Court's recent ruling on the Affordable Care Act, we found this helpful map from the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy, which shows all of the legal filings, decisions, and news in every state relating to the act. The map demonstrates how arguments over the constitutionality of the healthcare law varies across place.  
  • The McAllen Public Library in McAllen, Texas recently won a 2012 Library Interior Design Award from the International Interior Design Association for their 123,000 square-foot library which was built inside an old Wal-Mart Store. View a photographic tour of this repurposed facility. Atlanta University Center's Robert W. Woodruff Library Learning Commons also received an award in the competition. 
  • A joint investigation by National Public Radio and the Center for Public Integrity released in two parts (part one yesterday and part two today) this week suggests that federal rgulators have failed to protect coal miners in eastern Kentucky, southern West Virginia, and southwestern Virginia from breathing excessive amounts of toxic coal dust over the last thirty years. In the affected region, cases of the worst stage of "black lung" disease have quadrupled since 1980. The report featured photographs from Earl Dotter's "Quiet Sickness" series documenting coal miners from the 1960s and 1970s. See Dotter's 2008 Southern Spaces piece "Coalfield Generations: Health, Mining, and the Environment," in which he revisits and photographs some of the same towns featured in the "Quiet Sickness" series and discusses contemporary coal mining practices and healthcare. 
Posted on July 3, 2012
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Katie Rawson, Emory University

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Since 2005, a group of activists have annually reenacted the lynching of Roger and Dorothy Malcom and George and Mae Murray Dorsey, murdered on Moore’s Ford Bridge in Monroe, Georgia, on July 25, 1946.  In his Southern Spaces essay "'Holding on to Those Who Can't be Held': Reenacting a Lynching at Moore's Ford, Georgia," Mark Auslander explores the complexities of this ritual performance. This year's reenactment, occuring later this month, will be filmed for the documentary Always In Season by San Francisco-based filmaker Jacqueline Olive. Below is the flyer for the event, organized by Cassandra Greene and the Georgia Association of Black Elected Officials (GABEO):

66th Anniversary Commemoration and 8th Annual Reenactment of the Lynchings at the Moore’s Ford Bridge, Monroe, Georgia

Clyde Bradley, Reenactment of the Lynchings at the Moore’s Ford Bridge, Monroe, GA.

Remembering Victims of Lynchings Throughout the USA
Saturday, July 28, 2012, 12 Noon 
First African Baptist Church, 130 Tyler Street, Monroe, GA 30655
(at Highway 11, Across from Church’s Chicken)

Schedule

12 Noon - Church opens for meditation and prayers for justice.

1 p.m. - Pre-Reenactment rally. Invited guest speakers will include national and local Civil/Human Rights activists, clergy and political peaders.

Narrator, Mr. Robert Howard, Walton County Director, Min. Cassandra Greene, Director Ms. Hattie Lawson, Chair, Athens Area Human Relations Council

Reenactment Timeline

3:00 p.m. - Leave First African Baptist Church for visitation of the Malcom and Dorsey gravesites.

4:45 p.m. -  Arrive at the farm house of Barney Hester, 2932 Hester Town Road. (This is where the altercation occurred leading to the arrest of Roger Malcom, Sunday, July 14, 1946.)

5 p.m. -  Leave Barney Hester’s House

5:15 p.m. -  Arrive at the Old County Jail, 203 Milledge Avenue, Downtown Monroe. (This is where Roger Malcom was held for 11 days.)

5:30 p.m. -  Leave the jail en route to the Moore’s Ford Bridge. (This is the exact time that Loy Harrison, a white farmer, took the Malcoms and the Dorseys from the jail and delivered them to the KKK lynch mob waiting at the Moore’s Ford Bridge.)

6 p.m. - Arrive at the Moore’s Ford Bridge for the Reenactment Ceremony and Call for Justice: Arrest and Prosecution Now!!

7 p.m. - Benediction at the historic memorial marker dedicated to the legacy of Roger and Dorothy Malcom (and Justice, unborn infant) and George and Mae Murray Dorsey.
Here’s a Challenge to Us All to Continue Our Quest and Pursuit of Justice.

Information

Moore’s Ford Bridge Lynching is the last unsolved mass lynching in US History!

$35,000 Reward for info that leads to the arrest and prosecution of the killers. 

If you have information of the lynchings, please contact: The GBI – 404-244-2600 or the FBI – 404-679-9000. For more information contact: Rep. Tyrone Brooks, President, Georgia Association of Black Elected Officials, 404-656-6372 or 404-372-1894, Cassandra Greene, Director 770-899-7424, or visit our Web site: www.ga-gabeo.org.

Message to the killers: “You can run but you can’t hide forever!”
America, we must respect and uphold “The Rule of Law.”

Directions

From Atlanta:
Take I-20 East Exit 82 at Conyers-Athens (Highway 138). Turn left and head straight to Monroe (Pass McDonalds on your left and keep straight on Highway 78) Exit at Highway 11 (Monroe Exit). Turn right. Go one block and turn left on Tyler Street Church is on your left (look for Church’s Chicken on the right).

Coming I-20 West:
Exit at Monroe Monticello Exit 98. Turn right. Stay on Highway 11 straight to Monroe (approximately 13 miles). You will pass through downtown Social Circle. Go straight ahead to Monroe. Stay on Highway 11 Look for Church’s Chicken on your left. Turn right on Tyler Street You are at the church.

Coming From Athens:
Take Highway 78 West to Monroe Exit on East Spring Street.  Come into town. Take a right on Broad Street at courthouse (Hwy.11). Turn right and come up to Church’s Chicken. Turn right on Tyler Street.

Coming from Stone Mountain or Gwinnett County area:
Take Highway 78 East to Monroe.

Coming from Macon area:
Come to Monticello Take Highway 11 North all the way to Monroe. (Follow the instructions as outlined above.)

Note: If you pass Church’s Chicken you have gone too far.
Church Telephone Number 770-267-5819